Killellery

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Killellery

Killellery

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Killellery

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Killellery

77 Archival description results for Killellery

77 results directly related Exclude narrower terms

Annual Report 1871

Annual report and rental for year end June 1871, reporting a favourable financial situation on the estate and outlining the receipts and disbursements for the previous year. Describes the drainage of lands contiguous to the Clodiagh river and the formation of the Clodiagh Embankment, 490 statute perches in length. Also describes the completion of main drains at Derryweelan, Annagharvey and Killellery and notes improvements undertaken in Ballinagar and Ballyduff. In relation to buildings and repairs, he notes that there has been almost complete remodel of old houses and sundry other improvements 'that they might almost be classes as under new buildings.' Also reports that income from woods and plantations is reduced this year due to the 'improper and dishonest conduct of Forester Corbett'. Roskeen, Queen's County, is introduced to the accounts for the first time as an independent estate as Trench cites the differing rental schedules and differing counties as reasons for them not to be amalgamated in the rental.

In general, Trench is pleased not only with the improvements in the houses but also in the habits of the people, the tillage and agriculture and the green crops. On a more personal note, he expresses his 'deep grief' at the decision of his son, T. W. Trench to resign his post as Resident Agent on the Geashill estate. Describes him as 'beloved and respected by the tenantry and looked up to and appreciated by men of all creeds, politics or religions as a man of integrity, honour and intelligence.' Concludes by expressing this confidence that Lord Digby's nephew, Reginald Digby, will be an able successor to his son.

Annual Report 1859

Annual report for year ending July 1859, including a list of leasholders and undertenants who have surrendered their several leases; general account of income and expenditure; detailed statements of disbursements including costs of drainage and building improvements; a list for compensation for surrender of tenancies and emigration; and a detailed rental of entire estate.

Contains a summary report outlining the mechanism of the leaseholder's compensation fund, the distribution of which, W. S. Trench describes as 'the most arduous and most serious task of responsibility I have ever had to encounter.' Also discusses estate improvements such as the drainage of 125 statute acres, particularly in Meelaghans where 100 acres 'of miserable cut away bog' was drained and cultivated. Also discusses improvements to the labourers' cottages through the additions of chimneys and windows and a proposal to enter the new cottages for the award of the Gold Medal offered by the Royal Agricultural Society. Further estate improvements include new roads through Killellery, Lugmore and Meelaghans.

Agrarian unrest is also discussed in the context of the case of Henry Kane, tenant, who along with his brother, Michael Kane, each held a farm in Killurin. On the death of Michael, Henry took immediate posssession of his brother's farm, to which the Trenchs objected. Report discusses general tenant support for Kane, even from outside the estate, and includes descriptions of intimidatory tactics by Ribbonmen. Also discusses measures to have Henry Kane ejected from the land altogether.

Drawings in the report include:
Page 2: 'Ancient pan found on Geashill Estate, 4 feet broad x 14 inches deep' (The Geashill Cauldron)
Page 11: 'Ancient keg of butter found 12ft below surface of Red Bog. 2 feet long x 13 inches broad.'

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